HONORING THE CUSTOMER AGREEMENT?

I’ve seen Spoken Word Artist and Punk Music Icon Henry Rollins in Concert twice (once in a spoken word capacity and once in a performance capacity).

The former in Halifax, Nova Scotia and the latter in San Francisco, California with Rollins Band.

I then interviewed Henry for our Island Business News Publication last year.

I have also watched most of his spoken word videos.

Something I noticed is that Rollins gives everything he can during each performance to make the experience one to remember for his audience (customers).

The big question is of course, is it working?

Well, my girlfriend, who attended the Spoken Word show with me last year, and a person who didn’t even know who Rollins was months before, sat focused on every word for almost 3 hours without as much as a bathroom break, despite needed the bathroom for the last half of the show.

Just think of the impact to our careers or business community if every single company could achieve that level of interest in our products or services?

And just where did Henry learn about the importance of making it fully about his customers?

Well, I’m sure a lot of it is rooted in who he is, however, he shared a story at his spoken word show about speaking with David Lee Roth (yes, the jumping singer from Van Halen fame, and of course from The David Lee Roth band fame) about the importance of treating your customers (audience) like a million dollars during every single performance.

He said, and I’m paraphasing at best here – David said to me that “every person (aka. customer) who buys a ticket to your show is actually buying an agreement with you. Part of that agreement is that you will be fully there, in the moment, with those customers, giving 100% to every single aspect of your performance, during every show”

In relation to customer service, truer words may not have been spoken, and it may surprise you that it was Roth who passed along this insightful wisdom, but bear in mind that Roth’s participation in early Van Halen played a big part in why their concerts where among the more successful concerts (and concert experiences) of the time, and even perhaps a big part of their concerts grossing close to $100,000,000 during their recent reunion tour.

So, how can we apply this knowledge?

Once we start to realize that if a customer puts their faith in us and purchases our product (or even our brand), we have an obligation to give that customer 100% of our attention, focus, engagement, and to serve that customer with as much passion as we can during their interaction with our company, or at our place of employment, we’ll be much further along in our success in making each of our customer’s experiences all they can, and should be.

And bear in mind, we are customers too, and therefore, if we can improve the overall experience for our customers, it will eventually come back to benefit us as well.

Until that time,
cpoirier

Details on our new book at http://www.tisti.ca
Blog: http://www.gimmiemyketchup.com
Web: http://www.coreypoirier.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s